Pyrography is an art of illustrating patterns, especially on wood using a heated metallic pen and other supplies. Over the years, Pyrography has been used for decorating and branding an array of artifacts and musical instruments made of wood. For instance, woodworkers impart pyro patterns on kitchenware items or on acoustic guitars, branding not only the owner’s name on the product but also distinguishing them from others.

 

Pyrography is done to decorate the wooden surface primarily, although it can be performed on clay, leather, or on other products as well. Since the late 19th Century, the art form grew and people started to use it on wood in particular. That is why the wood burning tools, which are extensively used nowadays, owe a lot to the soldering pens discovered at the onset of the 20th Century. All thanks to that, Pyrography is now a minor woodworking project and hobby for kids especially if they are supervised by grownups.

 

If you enjoy the process of wood burning, it can inspire you to customize wooden gifts for your friends and family members. Aside from the wood burning pen, you would also need wood craft supplies such as carbon paper, paper towels that are wet, tape, sandpaper, and a design template that you can replicate on wood. However, it all starts with getting acquainted with respect to how to use the heated pen used for Pyrography.

 

The device featuring metallic end, which transfers heat to the tip, allows you to exert the pattern conceived onto wood. To understand the nuances of working on a wood burning project, grab scrap wood, heat the wood burning pen for around 5 minutes or so, and test draw the pattern on the wood. Ensure to cool the tool prior to changing the tips and heat it again for further few minutes.

 

The most important aspect of Pyrography is to go steadily and slowly much like you might do using a pencil. If you go quickly, the wood may not burn as properly as you want it, and the design might not appear good on the wood surface. You can use softwood for minor projects but for major Pyrography works, basswood, oak, or yellow pine, are commonly used by woodworkers. Note that softwood tends to burn at low temperatures, but hardwood usually withstands higher temperatures.